The Scientist

» data mining and developmental biology

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image: Disputes Over Text-Mining

Disputes Over Text-Mining

By | March 21, 2013

Computer programs that trawl research papers can reveal important large-scale patterns and facilitate further research, but publishers are wary.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Networking Medicine

Networking Medicine

By | March 2, 2013

Although fully organized patient-run trials are still few and far between, patients are taking a more active role in clinical research.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do-It-Yourself Medicine

Do-It-Yourself Medicine

By | March 1, 2013

Patients are sidestepping clinical research and using themselves as guinea pigs to test new treatments for fatal diseases. Will they hurt themselves, or science?

9 Comments

image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Biobank Yields Results

Biobank Yields Results

By | November 13, 2012

The largest collection of genetic and medical data in the United States links telomeres and genetic variants to longevity and disease.

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