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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Wondrous Truths</em>

Book Excerpt from Wondrous Truths

By | June 1, 2016

In Chapter 2 author J.D. Trout highlights the dividing line between truth and scientific “fact.”

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | June 1, 2016

14-day-old embryos, prioritizing biodiversity, and more

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

6 Comments

image: Mapping Traits to Genes with CRISPR

Mapping Traits to Genes with CRISPR

By | May 5, 2016

Researchers develop a technique to direct chromosome recombination with CRISPR/Cas9, allowing high-resolution genetic mapping of phenotypic traits in yeast.

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image: Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

By | May 4, 2016

This one will be largely based on the discredited anti-vaccine researcher’s 2010 book.

10 Comments

image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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In the book's prologue, author Frans de Waal considers the intellectual impediments to studying animal intelligence.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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