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» SARS and developmental biology

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image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: Scientists Confirm Bats Carry SARS

Scientists Confirm Bats Carry SARS

By | October 31, 2013

Whole-genome sequences for two novel coronaviruses from Chinese horseshoe bats are the most closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus to date.

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: The Many Mysteries of MERS

The Many Mysteries of MERS

By | September 8, 2013

As researchers test a treatment for Middle East respiratory syndrome, the deadly coronavirus that causes it slowly reveals itself.

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image: How Many Mammalian Viruses?

How Many Mammalian Viruses?

By | September 3, 2013

A project that identified almost every virus in the Indian flying fox heralds a new age of viral discovery.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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