The Scientist

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image: In Your Dreams

In Your Dreams

By | March 1, 2016

Understanding the sleeping brain may be the key to unlocking the secrets of the human mind.

1 Comment

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2016

March 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

1 Comment

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Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

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AAUP Champion Dies

By | January 26, 2016

Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, has passed away at age 87. 

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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image: First Dengue Vax Approved

First Dengue Vax Approved

By | December 11, 2015

Mexico’s health ministry has OKed the vaccine for people between nine and 45 years old.

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image: Drug Produced in GM Chicken Approved

Drug Produced in GM Chicken Approved

By | December 10, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights a rare-disease drug that is produced in the eggs of genetically modified chickens.

1 Comment

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