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» drug approval and developmental biology

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: FDA OKs First Biosimilar

FDA OKs First Biosimilar

By | March 6, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration approves Sandoz’s Zarxio, a biosimilar to Amgen’s filgrastim, which is mainly prescribed for cancer patients.

2 Comments

image: FDA Head Leaving Post

FDA Head Leaving Post

By | February 6, 2015

US Food and Drug Administration commissioner Margaret Hamburg is stepping down after six years on the job.

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image: Lazarus Drugs

Lazarus Drugs

By | February 1, 2015

While some drugs sail through development, others suffer setbacks, including FDA rejections, before reaching the market.  

1 Comment

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