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» protozoans, immunology and evolution

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image: Dinosaurs’ Shiny Black Feathers

Dinosaurs’ Shiny Black Feathers

By | March 9, 2012

A 130 million-year-old winged dinosaur offers scientist the oldest evidence of iridescent feathers.

2 Comments

image: Transplant Without Drugs?

Transplant Without Drugs?

By | March 8, 2012

A new method for transplanting immunologically mismatched organs may remove the need for life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection.

6 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 7, 2012

Meet the species whose DNA has recently been sequenced.

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image: Jurassic Parasites

Jurassic Parasites

By | March 1, 2012

Fossilized fleas dating as far back as 165 million years provide clues of early flea evolution.

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image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve

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image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

2 Comments

image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

6 Comments

image: Snake Tales

Snake Tales

By | March 1, 2012

An anthropologist and a herpetologist join forces to reveal the complex shared evolutionary and ecological history of pythons and primates.

8 Comments

image: Skin-Deep Immunity

Skin-Deep Immunity

By | February 29, 2012

Immune cells in skin provide powerful protection against infection, suggesting new routes for vaccination.

6 Comments

image: Long Live the Y

Long Live the Y

By | February 22, 2012

Despite suggestions to the contrary, the Y chromosome is not necessarily rotting away.

8 Comments

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