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image: Books on the <em>Beagle</em>

Books on the Beagle

By | July 17, 2014

An online reconstruction makes the library from Darwin’s famed ship more accessible. 

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image: Sizable Winged Dinosaur Found

Sizable Winged Dinosaur Found

By | July 17, 2014

Analysis of an approximately 125 million-year-old fossil found in China creates a new upper limit for microraptor size.

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image: Inherited Intelligence

Inherited Intelligence

By | July 10, 2014

Cognitive testing in chimpanzee pedigrees reveals a genetic basis for intelligence.

4 Comments

image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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image: Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

2 Comments

image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

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image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

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image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

13 Comments

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

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