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image: Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

By | January 10, 2014

Scientists present the first evidence that marine cyanobacteria release vesicles—billions and billions of vesicles.

2 Comments

image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Superbug Sickens Dozens in Illinois

Superbug Sickens Dozens in Illinois

By | January 9, 2014

A single hospital was at the epicenter of an outbreak of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

1 Comment

image: Dung Beetles Navigate by Sunlight

Dung Beetles Navigate by Sunlight

By | January 7, 2014

Shortly after demonstrating dung beetles’ ability to navigate by the stars, researchers in Sweden provide evidence that the insects can also use the sun to find their way.

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image: BBC Cameras Capture Dolphin High?

BBC Cameras Capture Dolphin High?

By | January 2, 2014

A new, two-part TV series to be aired on BBC1 includes video of dolphins playing with toxic puffer fish—possibly to get intoxicated.

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image: Benjamin tenOever: Going Viral

Benjamin tenOever: Going Viral

By | January 1, 2014

Professor, Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Age: 36

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image: Farmer Fungi

Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

3 Comments

image: tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014 Scientist to Watch Benjamin tenOever discusses his research.

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image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes and Autism

Gut Microbes and Autism

By | December 9, 2013

Dosing mice modeling autism with a human gut bacterium reversed some disorder-associated behaviors in the animals.

3 Comments

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