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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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image: Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

By | June 14, 2017

The brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

By | June 2, 2017

Prey stick to orb-weaver spider webs because their waxy outer layers mesh with spider silk to form a matrix glue.

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.

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image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

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