The Scientist

» behavior and immunology

Most Recent

image: Doggie Jealousy

Doggie Jealousy

By | July 25, 2014

Our canine companions may have the capacity to feel human-like jealousy, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2014

Sex on Earth, Wild Connection, The Classification of Sex, and XL Love

0 Comments

image: Laser-Guided Chastity

Laser-Guided Chastity

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists devise a precision-targeted system for training, tracking, and tweaking fruit fly social behavior.

1 Comment

image: Sex and Drugs

Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

image: The Love Bug

The Love Bug

By | July 1, 2014

A mysterious iridovirus outbreak in a lab colony of crickets reveals the virus’s ability to spur increased sexual activity.

1 Comment

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

1 Comment

image: UV Like an Addictive Substance?

UV Like an Addictive Substance?

By | June 19, 2014

Chronic exposure to ultraviolet light leads to endorphin release and signs of addiction in mice.

2 Comments

image: Anxious Crayfish

Anxious Crayfish

By | June 16, 2014

A crustacean appears anxious after a stressful experience, but a drug can fix it, according to a new study.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Stomach Cells Change Identity to Drive Precancerous State
  4. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
AAAS