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image: Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

Sensory Biology Around the Animal Kingdom

By | September 1, 2016

From detecting gravity and the Earth’s magnetic field to feeling heat and the movement of water around them, animals can do more than just see, smell, touch, taste, and hear.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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image: Fish Behavior Affected by Parasite

Fish Behavior Affected by Parasite

By | August 1, 2016

A common infection might be skewing experimental data on zebrafish.

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Researchers reveal how seals affect vegetation patterns and influence the movement of feral horse populations on Sable Island in Canada.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

By and | August 1, 2016

Why does cooperation evolve most often in monogamous animals?

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

By | August 1, 2016

The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.

2 Comments

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