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image: Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

Insect Cuticle Aids Spiders’ Traps

By | June 2, 2017

Prey stick to orb-weaver spider webs because their waxy outer layers mesh with spider silk to form a matrix glue.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

By | June 1, 2017

See how scientists designed food with amino acid compositions based on protein-coding regions in the genomes of mice and fruit flies.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Image of the Day: Social Drinking

Image of the Day: Social Drinking

By | April 28, 2017

Drunken crayfish will roll on their backs and enthusiastically perform tail flips in their tanks. The animals are more likely to display they behaviors after spending time in a social environment compared with an isolated one.

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