The Scientist

» behavior and developmental biology

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image: Distracting Tails

Distracting Tails

By | February 17, 2015

Luna moths use their long tails to throw bats off their trail.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: The Genetics of Society

The Genetics of Society

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers aim to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which a single genotype gives rise to diverse castes in eusocial organisms.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

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image: How Dogs Interpret Speech

How Dogs Interpret Speech

By | December 2, 2014

Dogs tend to turn to the left when they hear emotional speech-like sounds, and right when they hear verbal commands from a robot.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

By | November 19, 2014

The largest study yet of the genetic roots of homosexuality links sexual preference in men to two regions of the genome.

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image: Upside of Early-Life Stress?

Upside of Early-Life Stress?

By | November 18, 2014

Mice raised under stressful conditions are more adaptable as adults—and may pass this trait on to their pups.

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