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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: How Dogs Interpret Speech

How Dogs Interpret Speech

By | December 2, 2014

Dogs tend to turn to the left when they hear emotional speech-like sounds, and right when they hear verbal commands from a robot.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

Zeroing in on the “Gay Gene”

By | November 19, 2014

The largest study yet of the genetic roots of homosexuality links sexual preference in men to two regions of the genome.

7 Comments

image: Upside of Early-Life Stress?

Upside of Early-Life Stress?

By | November 18, 2014

Mice raised under stressful conditions are more adaptable as adults—and may pass this trait on to their pups.

1 Comment

image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Mouse Traps

Mouse Traps

By | November 1, 2014

How to avoid pitfalls in assays of mouse behavior

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image: Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

By | October 29, 2014

Allison Doupe, a neuroscientist known for her work exploring the neural mechanisms of learning, has passed away.

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image: Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

By | October 16, 2014

The production of new myelin in the brain—a function of non-neuronal glial cells—may be necessary for motor learning, a mouse study shows.

4 Comments

image: Mirrors May Not Be Enemies

Mirrors May Not Be Enemies

By | October 10, 2014

New research shows that using mirrors to elicit aggressive behavior from animals may not be a fool-proof plan.

1 Comment

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