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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Simplified Magnetogenetics

Simplified Magnetogenetics

By | March 25, 2016

A new technique allows researchers to rapidly and reversibly activate neurons with a magnetically sensitive protein.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Cave Dwellers, 1938

Cave Dwellers, 1938

By | March 1, 2016

Renowned sleep researcher Nathaniel Kleitman and a colleague spent a month underground to test the body’s natural rhythms.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 11, 2016

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Methylation’s Role in Eusocial Insect Behavior Questioned

Methylation’s Role in Eusocial Insect Behavior Questioned

By | January 22, 2016

Researchers re-examine the evidence for DNA methylation as the cause of behavioral differences among social insects.

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image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

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