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image: HIV Protein Boosts Cocaine's Effect

HIV Protein Boosts Cocaine's Effect

By | August 15, 2013

Mice whose brains express the HIV-1 Tat protein show a heightened response to the drug and appear more vulnerable to relapse.

1 Comment

image: Another Super Shrew

Another Super Shrew

By | July 24, 2013

A newly discovered sister species to the hero shrew shares its spine of steel, hinting at the evolution and function of the super-strong anatomical structure.

0 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2013

The Bonobo and the Atheist, The Philadelphia Chromosome, Lone Survivors, and Paleofantasy

2 Comments

image: The Understanding Dog

The Understanding Dog

By | February 12, 2013

Man’s best friend is better able to grasp their human owners’ points of view than previously realized.

1 Comment

image: Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

By | January 10, 2013

Bamboo sharks still developing in their egg cases respond to a predator presence by ceasing movement and even breathing.

0 Comments

image: Smoking, Taxes, and Genes

Smoking, Taxes, and Genes

By | December 14, 2012

New research suggests that some smokers may carry a gene variant that makes them less likely to quit simply because cigarette taxes are raised.

0 Comments

image: Crows Do It Again

Crows Do It Again

By | September 18, 2012

New Caledonian crows prove capable of yet another cognitive feat—inferring the actions of hidden people.

8 Comments

image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

1 Comment

image: Curiouser and Curiouser

Curiouser and Curiouser

By | August 23, 2012

A review of the new book Curious Behavior, which delves into the quirks of human conduct.

7 Comments

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