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image: Smoking, Taxes, and Genes

Smoking, Taxes, and Genes

By | December 14, 2012

New research suggests that some smokers may carry a gene variant that makes them less likely to quit simply because cigarette taxes are raised.

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image: Crows Do It Again

Crows Do It Again

By | September 18, 2012

New Caledonian crows prove capable of yet another cognitive feat—inferring the actions of hidden people.

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image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

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image: Curiouser and Curiouser

Curiouser and Curiouser

By | August 23, 2012

A review of the new book Curious Behavior, which delves into the quirks of human conduct.

7 Comments

image: The Spying Egg

The Spying Egg

By | August 15, 2012

Scientists place a silicon-filled computerized egg in a swan nest to learn about the birds’ hatching process.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | August 10, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2012

Gifts of the Crow, What the Robin Knows, The Unfeathered Bird, and America’s Other Audubon

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image: Megan Carey: Cerebellum Prober

Megan Carey: Cerebellum Prober

By | August 1, 2012

Group Leader, Neuroscience Program, Champalimaud Center for the Unknown, Lisbon, Portugal; HHMI International Early Career Scientist; Age: 38

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image: The Ultimate Social Data

The Ultimate Social Data

By | July 26, 2012

Facebook is considering allowing scientists to evaluate its user data without breaching its privacy policies.

2 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 24, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

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