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The Scientist

» heart and microbiology

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image: More Doubt Cast Over Cardiac Stem Cells

More Doubt Cast Over Cardiac Stem Cells

By | May 7, 2014

Contrary to previous reports, cell lineage tracing reveals stem cells in the heart rarely contribute to new muscle.

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image: Exosomes Vital for Heart Repair

Exosomes Vital for Heart Repair

By | May 6, 2014

Reparations after a heart attack in mice depend not on stem cells, but on the exosomes they secrete.

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

2 Comments

image: “Breakthrough” Tough to Reproduce

“Breakthrough” Tough to Reproduce

By | April 3, 2014

An independent group could not replicate the results of a highly cited heart regeneration protocol, while others say they have succeeded.  

6 Comments

image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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