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image: More Doubt Cast Over Cardiac Stem Cells

More Doubt Cast Over Cardiac Stem Cells

By | May 7, 2014

Contrary to previous reports, cell lineage tracing reveals stem cells in the heart rarely contribute to new muscle.

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image: Exosomes Vital for Heart Repair

Exosomes Vital for Heart Repair

By | May 6, 2014

Reparations after a heart attack in mice depend not on stem cells, but on the exosomes they secrete.

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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: “Breakthrough” Tough to Reproduce

“Breakthrough” Tough to Reproduce

By | April 3, 2014

An independent group could not replicate the results of a highly cited heart regeneration protocol, while others say they have succeeded.  

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

1 Comment

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