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image: Framingham Heart Study Gutted

Framingham Heart Study Gutted

By | August 26, 2013

The iconic Framingham Heart Study, the longest-running cardiovascular study in the country, has been hit with a $4 million budget cut.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Engineered Hearts Beat

Engineered Hearts Beat

By | August 15, 2013

Human stem cells take up residence in mouse hearts stripped of their own components, restoring some of the organs’ function.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

image: Choir Singers Synchronize Heartbeats

Choir Singers Synchronize Heartbeats

By | July 10, 2013

Singers in a choir unconsciously coordinate their breathing patterns, which leads to synchronized heart rates, especially during slow chanting.

1 Comment

image: Stem-Cell Heart Repair Questioned

Stem-Cell Heart Repair Questioned

By | July 8, 2013

A new analysis finds hundreds of discrepancies in publications from a German researcher who claims to have repaired diseased hearts using stem-cell therapy.  

3 Comments

image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

3 Comments

image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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