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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Doodoo Rendezvous

Doodoo Rendezvous

By | July 1, 2014

Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.

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The British public votes to make creating a better test for bacterial infections the goal of the UK government’s Longitude Prize.

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Spiders Try to Ensure Paternity

Spiders Try to Ensure Paternity

By | June 11, 2014

Male dwarf spiders deploy sperm-blocking plugs to thwart the reproductive chances of their mate’s subsequent suitors.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

Immunology and Neurology Pioneer Dies

By | May 24, 2014

Gerald Edelman, who broke new ground in two distinct fields of life science, has passed away at age 84.

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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: Sharing the Wealth

Sharing the Wealth

By | May 1, 2014

From research results to electronic health records, biomedical data are becoming increasingly accessible. How can scientists best capitalize on the information deluge?

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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