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image: All Systems Go

All Systems Go

By | December 1, 2014

Alan Aderem earned his PhD while under house arrest for protesting apartheid in South Africa. His early political involvement has guided his scientific focus, encouraging fellow systems biologists to study immunology and infectious diseases.

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image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.

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image: Clone Wars

Clone Wars

By | December 1, 2014

Watch scenes from the 2013 World Dairy Expo, where KHW Regiment Apple-Red-ET won the reserve championship while her clone took home the grand championship.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Science Speak

Science Speak

By | August 1, 2014

Contests that challenge young scientists to explain their research without jargon are turning science communication into a competitive sport.

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image: Scientific Elevator Pitches

Scientific Elevator Pitches

By | August 1, 2014

A number of competitions around the world are challenging young scientists to describe their research in mere minutes.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Doodoo Rendezvous

Doodoo Rendezvous

By | July 1, 2014

Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.

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The British public votes to make creating a better test for bacterial infections the goal of the UK government’s Longitude Prize.

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