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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Science Speak

Science Speak

By | August 1, 2014

Contests that challenge young scientists to explain their research without jargon are turning science communication into a competitive sport.

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image: Scientific Elevator Pitches

Scientific Elevator Pitches

By | August 1, 2014

A number of competitions around the world are challenging young scientists to describe their research in mere minutes.

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image: Doodoo Rendezvous

Doodoo Rendezvous

By | July 1, 2014

Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.

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The British public votes to make creating a better test for bacterial infections the goal of the UK government’s Longitude Prize.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Spiders Try to Ensure Paternity

Spiders Try to Ensure Paternity

By | June 11, 2014

Male dwarf spiders deploy sperm-blocking plugs to thwart the reproductive chances of their mate’s subsequent suitors.

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