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image: Rat Race

Rat Race

By | January 1, 2015

Neuroscientist Anthony Zador explains why he uses rats to understand auditory attention in the brain.

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image: Tangle Trigger

Tangle Trigger

By | January 1, 2015

An enzyme that cleaves tau protein in acidic cellular conditions may trigger early events in Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

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image: Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

Toward Lab-Grown Gametes

By | December 30, 2014

From stem cells, scientists generate early egg- and sperm-like cells in vitro.

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image: 2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts

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image: Brain-Machine Interface Goes Wireless

Brain-Machine Interface Goes Wireless

By | December 18, 2014

A paralyzed woman has used mind power and a robotic arm wirelessly connected to her brain to achieve the most dexterous movement yet accomplished with BMI.

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image: Reprogramming Redux

Reprogramming Redux

By | December 18, 2014

Can mechanical forces alone be manipulated to create stem-like cells?

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image: Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?

By | December 11, 2014

Propolis, a natural product used by honeybees to repair their hives, stimulates hair growth in shaved mice.

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image: Big Data and the Brain

Big Data and the Brain

By | December 8, 2014

Advances in imaging have inundated neuroscientists with massive amounts of information on synaptic connections, among other things. The challenge now is to understand it all.

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image: Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

By | December 8, 2014

Blocking activity of a kinase in a mouse model protects Golgi in cells and reduces the build-up of amyloid β, a primary component of Alzheimer’s disease.

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