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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

2 Comments

image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

1 Comment

image: Signaling Resistance

Signaling Resistance

By | April 1, 2015

Activating signaling pathways, rather than individual genes, reveals roles for both growth and dedifferentiation in establishing resistance to cancer treatments.

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image: Toggling Between Life and Death

Toggling Between Life and Death

By | April 1, 2015

In estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, the transcription factor IRF1 tips the balance between cellular suicide and survival through autophagy.

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image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

5 Comments

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

By | March 25, 2015

The earthiness of Merlot may have to do with grapevine-dwelling microbiota.

2 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

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