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image: Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

By | October 19, 2012

The blogosphere voices widespread condemnation for a sexist comment made by a researcher attending this week’s annual Society for Neuroscience conference.

8 Comments

image: Venter Supports DNA Printers

Venter Supports DNA Printers

By | October 17, 2012

The famed geneticist says his team is testing 3-D DNA printers that could churn out vaccines at home.

1 Comment

image: A Parasite’s Parasites

A Parasite’s Parasites

By | October 15, 2012

French scientists identify a new giant virus, which carries the genome of a smaller virus and a new breed of mobile DNA.

5 Comments

image: Brain Scans Predict Reading Skills

Brain Scans Predict Reading Skills

By | October 9, 2012

New research shows that the growth of long-range connections between brain regions predicts how well a child will learn to read.

0 Comments

image: Growing New Neurons

Growing New Neurons

By | October 4, 2012

Brain cells called pericytes can be reprogrammed into neurons with just two proteins, pointing to a novel way to treat neurodegenerative disorders.

5 Comments

image: “Alive” and In Focus

“Alive” and In Focus

By | October 1, 2012

Imaging viruses in action

0 Comments

image: Drug Allergy in the Pocket

Drug Allergy in the Pocket

By | October 1, 2012

An HIV drug can bind to and alter the function of an immune molecule, causing a dangerous reaction in patients with a particular allele.

0 Comments

image: Sex Matters

Sex Matters

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers reveal a new pathway of synaptic modulation in the hippocampus exclusive to females.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

0 Comments

image: Removing the Optimism Bias

Removing the Optimism Bias

By | September 24, 2012

Disrupting a small part of the brain with a magnetic field can reduce people’s prejudice towards good news.

8 Comments

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