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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: NYC’s Pathogen-Riddled Rats

NYC’s Pathogen-Riddled Rats

By | October 15, 2014

Researchers find more than a dozen brand new viruses lurking in rodents inhabiting the Big Apple.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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