The Scientist

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image: A Lifetime of Viruses

A Lifetime of Viruses

By | June 4, 2015

Scientists devise an antibody-based test that can generate a person’s complete “viral history” with just one drop of blood.


image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.


image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?


image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.


image: Cooperative Control

Cooperative Control

By | February 10, 2015

With the help of a virus that infects its prey’s nervous system, a parasitoid wasp coerces a lady beetle to protect its young.

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image: TS Live: The Enemy Within

TS Live: The Enemy Within

By | February 1, 2015

How viruses wield tiny molecules of RNA to help them persist in our bodies for years, decades, and sometimes an entire life span


image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.


image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.


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