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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Cleansing the Clinic

Cleansing the Clinic

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists set up a stakeout to track the movements of microbes around a new hospital.

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image: Neuron Preservers

Neuron Preservers

By | January 1, 2013

Unlike epithelial cells, neurons respond to herpes infection through autophagy, rather than by releasing inflammatory factors.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

Special Review for H5N1 Grants?

By | December 4, 2012

The National Institutes of Health reveals a controversial plan to regulate the funding of H5N1 research.

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image: Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

Virus Monopolizes Host’s Repairmen

By | November 29, 2012

Human cytomegalovirus fixes its broken DNA by exclusively co-opting its host’s repair proteins.

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image: Ebola from Pigs to Monkeys

Ebola from Pigs to Monkeys

By | November 15, 2012

A deadly Ebola virus can spread from pigs to monkeys without direct contact, pointing to pig farms as a possible contributor to outbreaks.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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