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Games for Science

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists are using video games to tap the collective intelligence of people around the world, while doctors and educators are turning to games to treat and teach.

7 Comments

image: Genomics-Informed Pathology

Genomics-Informed Pathology

By | January 1, 2013

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

1 Comment

image: Limber LIMS

Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

1 Comment

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Neuron Preservers

By | January 1, 2013

Unlike epithelial cells, neurons respond to herpes infection through autophagy, rather than by releasing inflammatory factors.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

2 Comments

image: Drug Approvals Up

Drug Approvals Up

By | December 7, 2012

The total number of new drugs approved this year ties last year for the highest since 2004, suggesting that the pharmaceutical industry is recovering.  

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image: Hurry Up, FDA

Hurry Up, FDA

By | December 6, 2012

The US Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to get new devices on the market sooner—and antibiotics may be next.

0 Comments

image: MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

By | December 5, 2012

Researchers identify microRNAs that keep cardiac cells healthy after heart attack, potentially paving the way for future heart regenerating therapies.

1 Comment

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