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1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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A Lifetime of Viruses

By | June 4, 2015

Scientists devise an antibody-based test that can generate a person’s complete “viral history” with just one drop of blood.

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Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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Cooperative Control

By | February 10, 2015

With the help of a virus that infects its prey’s nervous system, a parasitoid wasp coerces a lady beetle to protect its young.

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image: TS Live: The Enemy Within

TS Live: The Enemy Within

By | February 1, 2015

How viruses wield tiny molecules of RNA to help them persist in our bodies for years, decades, and sometimes an entire life span

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A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

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