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image: Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

By | August 8, 2017

A failing heart is easily distinguished from a healthy one by numerous tell-tale signs, including its slender, stretched-out walls, increased size, and pooled blood clots.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Chemogenetics Doesn’t Work Like Many Thought

Chemogenetics Doesn’t Work Like Many Thought

By | August 4, 2017

A study finds the so-called DREADD method of manipulating neurons using a drug called CNO actually works via clozapine.

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image: Fascinated by Folding

Fascinated by Folding

By | August 4, 2017

Lila Gierasch uses biochemical tools to understand how linear chains of amino acids turn into complex three-dimensional structures.

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image: Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

By | July 31, 2017

Marian Diamond, a former University of California, Berkeley, professor, discovered the first evidence for neuroplasticity and studied Einstein’s brain.

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The football league and the government agency part ways over how the money should be used.

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image: Stem Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in Mice

Stem Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in Mice

By | July 26, 2017

Once implanted into animals’ brains, neural stem cells that secrete microRNA-containing vesicles seem to contribute to an anti-aging effect.

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A new method stimulates B cells to make human antigen-specific antibodies, obviating the need for vaccinating blood donors or hunting for rare B cells.

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S. Allen Counter pursued scientific questions within various cultures throughout the world.

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image: Image of the Day: Cortical Lightning Storm

Image of the Day: Cortical Lightning Storm

By | July 18, 2017

Neurons in a mouse model of autism consistently fire in response to whisker agitation.

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