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image: Link to Second Heart Attack Uncovered

Link to Second Heart Attack Uncovered

By | June 27, 2012

Researchers elucidate how a first heart attack sets the stage for later heart trouble by boosting inflammatory cell development.

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image: A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

By | December 22, 2011

Mutations known to increase the risk of developing ovarian and breast cancer may also make carriers susceptible to heart failure.

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image: Stem Cells Traced To Heart

Stem Cells Traced To Heart

By | December 1, 2011

New research suggests that a controversial class of stem cells originates in the heart and retains some ability to repair damaged tissue.

3 Comments

image: Not Salt's Fault?

Not Salt's Fault?

By | July 7, 2011

New research raises doubt about whether cutting dietary sodium reduces risk of death from heart disease.

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image: Repairing hearts

Repairing hearts

By | June 8, 2011

Upon activation, a novel population of resident cardiac cells forms new muscle after damage.

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image: The Heart of the Matter

The Heart of the Matter

By | April 1, 2011

Are miRNAs useful for tracking and treating cardiovascular disease?

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