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» salary survey, evolution and neuroscience

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image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

By | June 9, 2014

An advisory committee for the BRAIN Initiative says that to fully fund the goals of the neuroscience research program, taxpayers should fork over $4.5 billion.

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image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

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image: Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

By | June 1, 2014

Using just three dopaminergic neurons, Drosophila larvae can sense whether a food source lacks a full roster of essential amino acids.

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image: Kavli Congrats

Kavli Congrats

By | May 30, 2014

A nonet of scientists, including researchers in nano-optics and in the neuroscience of memory, earned the 2014 Kavli prizes.

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image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.

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