Advertisement

The Scientist

» scientific fraud and immunology

Most Recent

image: MIT Lab Retracts Paper

MIT Lab Retracts Paper

By | February 15, 2013

A paper describing a new method for imaging synapse formation has been retracted after it emerged that the first author falsified data to prove its effectiveness.

1 Comment

image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.

4 Comments

image: Physiologist Faked Data

Physiologist Faked Data

By | February 5, 2013

A Case Western Reserve University researcher is found guilty of altering the number of samples and results to inflate the statistical significance of his findings.

1 Comment

image: New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

By | February 4, 2013

One of the most advanced tuberculosis vaccines has failed to protect infants from getting the disease in a clinical trial, but it may be effective in adults.

1 Comment

image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

0 Comments

image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Rhinoviruses Exposed

Rhinoviruses Exposed

By | February 1, 2013

Some of these insidious viruses expertly subvert the host immune system, allowing their unhindered proliferation.

0 Comments

image: Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

By | January 28, 2013

A University of Wisconsin neuroscientist is found guilty of falsifying Western blots as part of his stroke research, and has requested the retraction of two papers.

1 Comment

image: Men Cheat More Often

Men Cheat More Often

By | January 22, 2013

Male scientists commit research misconduct more often than their female peers, and senior researchers are more likely to engage in fraud than trainees.

2 Comments

image: Misconduct Apology

Misconduct Apology

By | January 18, 2013

A neurodegenerative disease researcher found guilty of fabricating results in funding applications has written an open letter of apology and clarification.

0 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Rainin Instrument
Rainin Instrument
Advertisement
Life Technologies