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image: Cord Blood Cells Foretell Food Allergy

Cord Blood Cells Foretell Food Allergy

By | January 13, 2016

Scientists link an immune phenotype present at birth to the development of food allergies a year later.

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image: Fraudulent Paper Pulled

Fraudulent Paper Pulled

By | January 5, 2016

Nature retracts a study six years after an investigation found that the protein structures it reported were fabricated.

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image: Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

By | January 4, 2016

A gene-expression signature correlates with a person’s likelihood of experiencing adverse events after receiving a seasonal flu vaccine, scientists show. 

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image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

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image: Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

By | December 21, 2015

Health officials suspect recently reported cases of the disease in Liberia might stem from a flare-up of the virus in a survivor who became pregnant.

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image: When the Flu Vax Fails

When the Flu Vax Fails

By | December 16, 2015

The status of a person’s immune system can predict when a seasonal flu vaccination will not provide sufficient protection, according to a study. 

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image: Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

By | December 1, 2015

Warning signs that scandal might be brewing in your lab  

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image: Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

By | November 30, 2015

A second doctor shows symptoms of ocular disease after recovering from Ebola infection.

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image: Birth of the Skin Microbiome

Birth of the Skin Microbiome

By | November 17, 2015

The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

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