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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

2 Comments

image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

2 Comments

image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

3 Comments

image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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