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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

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Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Glia Guru

Glia Guru

By | May 1, 2017

Ben Barres recast glial cells from supporting actors to star performers, crucial for synaptic plasticity in the brain and for preventing neurodegenerative disorders.

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image: Myelin Basics

Myelin Basics

By | May 1, 2017

May Profilee Ben Barres of Stanford University discusses how understanding the basic biology of myelination could help patients with multiple sclerosis and other diseases.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

By | May 1, 2017

Understanding how people recognize and control their own bodies could help researchers develop therapies for those who’ve lost their sense of self.

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image: Developing Brains in Dishes

Developing Brains in Dishes

By | April 26, 2017

Two studies report methods to mimic human fetal brain development using neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells that form 3-D, brain-like structures. 

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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