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image: New Gecko-Inspired Adhesive

New Gecko-Inspired Adhesive

By | April 6, 2016

Flexible patches of silicone that stick to skin and conduct electricity could serve as the basis for a new, reusable electrode for medical applications.

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image: Top Technical Advances 2015

Top Technical Advances 2015

By | December 24, 2015

The Scientist’s choice of major improvements in imaging, optogenetics, single-cell analyses, and CRISPR

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Wired Flower

By | November 24, 2015

Researchers use a conducting polymer to construct circuits inside plant cuttings in a proof-of-concept study.

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image: Identity-Shifting Brain Cells

Identity-Shifting Brain Cells

By | September 10, 2015

Cortical interneurons in mice exhibit activity-dependent alterations to their characteristic firing patterns.

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image: Cutting the Wire

Cutting the Wire

By | December 1, 2014

Optical techniques for monitoring action potentials

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image: The Body Electric, 1840s

The Body Electric, 1840s

By | November 1, 2014

Emil du Bois-Reymond’s innovations for recording electrical signals from living tissue set the stage for today’s neural monitoring techniques.

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image: Retina Recordings

Retina Recordings

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists adapt an in vivo retina recorder for ex vivo use.

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image: Cortical Computing

Cortical Computing

By | October 28, 2013

A study shows that dendrites not only transmit information between neurons, but also process some of that information.

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image: Next Generation: The Brain Bot

Next Generation: The Brain Bot

By | May 29, 2012

A 30-year-old technique to record the electrical activity of neurons gets a robotic makeover.

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image: What the Brain Hears

What the Brain Hears

By | February 1, 2012

By recording nerve impulses in sound-processing regions of the brain, researchers can recreate the words people think.

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