The Scientist

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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Tips on how to surmount the challenges of working with CRISPR to manipulate genes in human stems cells to study their function in specific diseases or to correct genetic defects in patient cells.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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