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» iPSCs, immunology and ecology

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image: Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

By | April 18, 2016

Induced pluripotent stem cells—particularly those generated from older patients—should be screened for defects in mitochondrial DNA, a study shows.

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image: Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

By | April 11, 2016

The virus infects and kills human neural stem cells and impedes brain tissue development, according to a study.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

By | April 5, 2016

Researchers create lab-grown mouse skin complete with hair follicles and sweat glands.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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