The Scientist

» iPSCs, ecology and developmental biology

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

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Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

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The Birthday Conference

By | November 1, 2012

Snapshots from an annual meeting that celebrates the birth of a prominent biologist

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A Celebrated Symposium

By | November 1, 2012

A conference, started 10 years ago partly as a disease ecologist’s birthday party, has become one of the most valued meetings in the field.  

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Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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Opinion: Fishy Deaths

By | October 29, 2012

Record fish die-offs in the Midwest call for a fresh look at how humans are disrupting the planet’s essential water cycle.

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Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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Natural-Born Doctors

By | October 23, 2012

Bees, sheep, and chimps are just a few of the animals known to self-medicate. Can they teach us about maintaining our own health?

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