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» iPSCs, ecology and developmental biology

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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image: Monkey See, Monkey Die

Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?

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image: Silent Canopies

Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.

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image: Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

Skin Cells Turned Into Immature Sperm

By | April 29, 2016

The reprogrammed germ-like cells were unable to fertilize eggs, however. 

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image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

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image: Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

By | April 18, 2016

Induced pluripotent stem cells—particularly those generated from older patients—should be screened for defects in mitochondrial DNA, a study shows.

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image: Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

By | April 11, 2016

The virus infects and kills human neural stem cells and impedes brain tissue development, according to a study.

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image: Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

By | April 5, 2016

Researchers create lab-grown mouse skin complete with hair follicles and sweat glands.

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