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image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

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image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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image: Opinion: Of Mice and Men

Opinion: Of Mice and Men

By | December 3, 2013

Researchers scramble to put mouse cancer models on solid footing.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Intracellular Spirals

Intracellular Spirals

By | December 1, 2013

Membrane twists connect stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets.

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image: Organelle Architecture

Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

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image: Proto-Organelles for Synthetic Cells

Proto-Organelles for Synthetic Cells

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers construct lipid-encapsulated compartments within synthetic cells.

2 Comments

image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

8 Comments

image: One Man's Trash...

One Man's Trash...

By | December 1, 2013

Scientists who dared to waste their time looking at the midbody, a remnant of cell division, have catapulted the organelle to new prominence.

2 Comments

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