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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

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image: The Biology of Politics

The Biology of Politics

By | November 6, 2012

A number of studies have linked genes and hormones to political attitudes and behaviors, though the evidence remains controversial.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Creative Emulsification

Creative Emulsification

By | November 1, 2012

Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies

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image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.

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image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Mapping Genetic Variation

Mapping Genetic Variation

By | October 31, 2012

The 1000 Genomes Project reveals the most comprehensive catalog to date of variation in the human genome.

1 Comment

image: Eggs Trade Genes

Eggs Trade Genes

By | October 24, 2012

Swapping chromosomes from one human egg to another could eliminate mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause disease.

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    To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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