The Scientist

» neural stem cell and ecology

Most Recent

image: Mini Brains Model Zika Infection

Mini Brains Model Zika Infection

By | April 22, 2016

Researchers create cerebral organoids in 3-D–printed bioreactors that can be used to model Zika infection.

0 Comments

image: Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

By | April 11, 2016

The virus infects and kills human neural stem cells and impedes brain tissue development, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

0 Comments

image: How Zika Infiltrates Developing Brains

How Zika Infiltrates Developing Brains

By | March 30, 2016

Zika virus may commandeer a receptor on the surface of neural progenitor cells, scientists show.

0 Comments

A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

1 Comment

image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

0 Comments

image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS