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image: Abundant, Widespread Virus Discovered

Abundant, Widespread Virus Discovered

By | July 29, 2014

Scientists identify a bacteriophage that is highly abundant in the gut bacteria of people around the world.

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image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

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image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

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image: “Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

“Mucho” Ado About Nothing?

By | July 15, 2014

Linking a mold identified in a sample of recalled yogurt to consumer-reported illnesses may be premature, scientists say.

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image: Eyes, Nose as Windows to Alzheimer’s

Eyes, Nose as Windows to Alzheimer’s

By | July 14, 2014

Failing a sniff test or screening positive on an eye exam may predict people’s chances of developing the neurodegenerative disorder.

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image: Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

By | July 10, 2014

Olfactory receptors in the skin may help repair damaged tissue, a study shows.

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image: New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

By | July 9, 2014

An updated analysis of the gut microbiome extends the list of known bacterial genes to 9.8 million. 

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: Mobile Microbiome

Mobile Microbiome

By | June 26, 2014

Cell phones are populated with many bacteria commonly found on users’ hands. 

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image: The Wound Microbiome

The Wound Microbiome

By | June 23, 2014

Determining which critters are present in an infected wound could aid in treatment, particularly of soldiers injured in combat.

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