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image: Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

By | November 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Bates College. Age: 37

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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image: Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

By | September 1, 2016

From the gut and airways to the blood, muscle, and skin, diverse sensory receptors are doing unconventional things.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: Flavor Savors

Flavor Savors

By | January 1, 2016

Odors experienced via the mouth are essential to our sense of taste.

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image: Olfactory Fingerprints

Olfactory Fingerprints

By | June 24, 2015

People can be identified by the distinctive ways they perceive odors, a new study shows.

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image: Pleasure To Smell You

Pleasure To Smell You

By | March 4, 2015

People tend to sniff their mitts after shaking hands with someone of the same sex, suggesting that the traditional greeting may transmit chemosensory signals.

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image: Microbial Masterpieces

Microbial Masterpieces

By | February 12, 2015

Artist Anicka Yi explores the beauty of bacteria.

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image: Misconduct Ruling for Old Retractions

Misconduct Ruling for Old Retractions

By | July 31, 2014

Zhihua Zou, formerly of Nobel Laureate Linda Buck’s lab, engaged in research misconduct that resulted in the retraction of two highly cited papers.

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image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

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