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image: Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

By | July 5, 2017

Animals lacking a sense of smell stayed thinner than their smelling counterparts, despite eating the same amount.

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image: Image of the Day: Smell You Later

Image of the Day: Smell You Later

By | May 15, 2017

Adult olfactory stem cells can be used to grow a smattering of cells important for smell, including scent-sniffing neurons and structurally supportive sustentacular cells. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

By | November 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Bates College. Age: 37

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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image: Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

By | September 1, 2016

From the gut and airways to the blood, muscle, and skin, diverse sensory receptors are doing unconventional things.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

3 Comments

image: Flavor Savors

Flavor Savors

By | January 1, 2016

Odors experienced via the mouth are essential to our sense of taste.

2 Comments

image: Olfactory Fingerprints

Olfactory Fingerprints

By | June 24, 2015

People can be identified by the distinctive ways they perceive odors, a new study shows.

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image: Pleasure To Smell You

Pleasure To Smell You

By | March 4, 2015

People tend to sniff their mitts after shaking hands with someone of the same sex, suggesting that the traditional greeting may transmit chemosensory signals.

2 Comments

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