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Contributors

By | March 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Discovering Archaea, 1977

Discovering Archaea, 1977

By | March 1, 2014

Ribosomal RNA fingerprints reveal the three domains of life.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #5

The Scientist on The Pulse #5

By | February 26, 2014

Bee virus spreads, blight-reistant potato, OCD in dogs

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image: Week in Review: February 17–21

Week in Review: February 17–21

By | February 21, 2014

Human vs. dog brains; widespread neuronal regeneration in human adult brain; honeybee disease strikes wild insects; trouble replicating stress-induced stem cells

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image: Week in Review: February 10–14

Week in Review: February 10–14

By | February 14, 2014

First Ancient North American genome; cannabinoids connect hunger with olfaction and eating; biotechs explore crowdfunding; confronting creationism

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image: Opinion: Confronting Creationism

Opinion: Confronting Creationism

By | February 7, 2014

Five reasons why scientists should stay out of debates over evolution.

55 Comments

image: An Offensive Playbook

An Offensive Playbook

By | February 1, 2014

Developing nonaddictive drugs to combat pain

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

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