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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: Laugh, Then Think: The Ig Nobels

Laugh, Then Think: The Ig Nobels

By | September 21, 2015

This year’s awards honor research on bee stings, appendicitis, kissing, and more.

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image: Phytochemical Helps Differentiate Workers from Queen Bees

Phytochemical Helps Differentiate Workers from Queen Bees

By | August 28, 2015

The consumption of p-coumaric acid, a chemical found in honey and pollen, may help set a female honeybee on its course to becoming a worker instead of a queen.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Recent Decline in Honeybee Deaths

Recent Decline in Honeybee Deaths

By | May 19, 2014

Fewer commercial pollinators died over the winter than during the same season the preceding year.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #5

The Scientist on The Pulse #5

By | February 26, 2014

Bee virus spreads, blight-reistant potato, OCD in dogs

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image: Week in Review: February 17–21

Week in Review: February 17–21

By | February 21, 2014

Human vs. dog brains; widespread neuronal regeneration in human adult brain; honeybee disease strikes wild insects; trouble replicating stress-induced stem cells

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image: A Political Battle Over Pesticides

A Political Battle Over Pesticides

By | April 10, 2013

Bees, the pollinators of a third of the world’s food crops, are in peril. And that’s about the only thing scientists, environmentalists, policy makers, and agro-industrialists can agree on.

9 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 11, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Honey Bee Killer

Honey Bee Killer

By | June 11, 2012

A parasitic mite helps spread a deadly virus among honey bee colonies.

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