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image: Viral Protein Boosts Muscle Mass in Male Mice

Viral Protein Boosts Muscle Mass in Male Mice

By | September 14, 2016

An endogenous retrovirus that supports placenta formation in females also helps male mice build muscle, according to a study.

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image: Proprioceptive Receptors

Proprioceptive Receptors

By and | September 1, 2016

Feedback from muscle spindles and tendon organs provides information about where our bodies are in space and whether or not they are moving.

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image: Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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image: Latest on Disputed “Youthful” Protein

Latest on Disputed “Youthful” Protein

By | April 4, 2016

Studies reach conflicting conclusions on GDF11 as a rejuvenating factor.

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image: Expected Retraction Published

Expected Retraction Published

By | January 13, 2016

The repeal of a Molecular Endocrinology paper is the second of three anticipated retractions from a cell biologist.

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image: CRISPR Improves Disease in Adult Mice

CRISPR Improves Disease in Adult Mice

By | January 4, 2016

Three groups of researchers used the gene-editing method to restore a protein deficient in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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image: Fat Saps Muscle

Fat Saps Muscle

By | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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image: Not So Noncoding

Not So Noncoding

By | June 1, 2015

An RNA thought to be noncoding in fact encodes a small protein that regulates calcium uptake in muscle.

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image: Studies Conflict on Regenerative Molecule

Studies Conflict on Regenerative Molecule

By | May 19, 2015

Previously shown to boost muscle growth in aged mice, a protein’s role in regeneration just got more complicated.

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image: Neuro-Insights into Holding It

Neuro-Insights into Holding It

By | October 17, 2014

Scientists reveal the neural underpinnings—and muscles tightly linked with—the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which comprises muscles that help us delay urination.

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